Archive for category Nutritional Therapy and Related Topics

BANT Launches its Nutrigenetic Counsellor Register

INTRODUCTION

Advancing knowledge in nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics heralds a new era in the contribution of personal nutrition advice to promote and maintain optimal health through all life stages. The new paradigm of personalised nutrition demands wider competencies and an increased capability from nutritional therapists to encompass areas such as genetics, genomics, toxicology, risk assessment and communication, and an appreciation of the ethical, legal and social issues surrounding the use of genetic information.

Nutritional therapists have followed a complex model for some time which underpins the difference in approach to the nutritional influence on health from that of current dietetic practice. Nutritional therapy recognises that complex systems adapt over time, and that up-to-date emerging scientific advances must be incorporated into practice in a timely manner.

WHAT IS A NUTRIGENETIC COUNSELLOR

Professional dietary and nutritional advice tailored to individual genotype – where complex interactions between diet, nutrition and other lifestyle practices, as well as age, gender and current health status, are translated into protocols – may be termed ‘Nutrigenetic Counselling’. Nutritional Therapists wishing to incorporate Nutrigenetic Counselling into their practice need to assimilate new knowledge, skills and attitudes for enhanced performance. Core to this knowledge is ‘genetic literacy’. Members of the public wishing to benefit from nutrigenetic counselling can then be assured of appropriate standards of quality assurance.

NUTRIGENETIC COUNSELLOR REGISTER

BANT Council is pleased to announce the launch of its Register of Nutrigenetic Counsellors. This fulfils BANT’s commitment to the Human Genetics Commission that it would set up an advanced practice register covering nutrigenetic counselling following the HGC’s ‘Genes Direct’ reports in 2003 and 2007.

Initial registration will be based on experience and training in the use of genetic profiles/tests. The Nutritional Therapy Education Commission (NTEC) will be consulting on standards for training and an advanced practice framework during the summer. This register is only open for Nutritional Therapists who are members of BANT and registered with the CNHC.

APPLY FOR ENTRY ONTO THE NUTRIGENETIC COUNSELLOR (NgC) REGISTER

Advertisements

, ,

Leave a comment

Quantum Biology Video

Selected videos at the cutting edge of science. Genetic diversity reflects evolutionary pressures from environmental changes, principally climate and diet. These drivers explain why populations and individuals vary and why one-size-fits-all dietary guidelines and public health nutrition approaches derive from out-of-date reductionist science. Nutritional therapy is person-centred, recognising individuality and the complex network of environmental factors which influence health status.

Remember to subscribe to the BANT You Tube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/BANTNT

Quantum Biology

1) Quantum Life – Prof. Seth Lloyd

Seth Lloyd is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT.

Prof. Lloyd is interested in information and the role it plays in physical systems, particularly systems in the quantum regime. Specific questions are: How do physical systems register information and move it about? How is information transformed and processed? And, most importantly, how do the ways in which a system transfers and transforms information determine its behavior?

He has worked on the definition of complexity using insights gained from the work of Rolf Landauer on physics of information processing and of Charles Bennett on computational measures of complexity. The definition of complexity he developed is related to the amount of thermodynamic resources required to perform a given task. Subsequently, he became a collector of measures of complexity: despite the proliferation of apparently disparate methods for quantifying the complex, he has been able to show that most such measures are closely related to each other. The definitions measure either information — the difficulty of describing a thing; or effort — the difficulty of accomplishing a task; or both.

The realization that information processing and physics are intimately related lie at the heart of Prof. Lloyd’s current work on quantum computation. Quantum computers are in essence complex quantum systems. In collaboration with Murray Gell-Mann he is working on a theory of quantum complexity. He hopes to use quantum mechanical computers to test methods by which the highly detailed, complex world that we see around us arose out of a highly symmetric, simple quantum world in the early universe.

As part of learning his current job as a professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT, he has discovered the importance of work on complex systems for society as a whole. When the operation of a new car relies on the proper functioning of twenty microprocessors, when fear of a computer glitch inspires a global apocalyptic movement, when electronic devices from VCRs to toasters act as if they had minds of their own, it’s clear that our future welfare depends crucially on understanding how complex systems get information, and what they do with it.

1) The Nature of the Sense of Smell – Dr Luca Turin

Turin earned his Ph.D. in physiology at University College London. From 1982 until 1988, he worked in France as a researcher for the CNRS at the Villefranche Marine Station near Nice. He was then employed at the Pasteur Institute from 1988 until 1990.

After leaving the CNRS, Turin first held a visiting research position at the National Institutes of Health in North Carolina before moving back to London, where he became a lecturer in biophysics at University College London.

As of 2010, Turin is currently at MIT, working on a project to develop an electronic nose based in part on his theories, financed by DARPA. From April 2011 on, he will be working at the Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Centre in Vari, Greece.

Turin is the author of the book The Secret of Scent (2006), which details the history and science of his theory of olfaction, and an acclaimed critical guide to perfume, Parfums: Le Guide, with two editions published in French in 1992 and 1994. He is also the subject of the 2002 book The Emperor of Scent by Chandler Burr, as well as of the 1995 BBC Horizon documentary “A Code in the Nose.”

 

Leave a comment

Nuffield Health Recruits Nutritional Therapists for 20 of their Top UK Sites

Nuffield Health has just recruited 20 Nutritional Therapists to work in a clinical setting alongside other healthcare providers supporting the delivery of Nuffield Health’s unique wellbeing membership packages, and helping manage a range of health conditions. Nutritional Therapists will also be offering expert-led nutritional touch points, in line with Nuffield’s excellent service standards and clinical guidelines. The roles have an important education component, with both Nuffield’s members and employees in mind. Roles range from 1 to 3 days a week at different sites, on a self-employed basis.

Nuffield Health is a private non-for profit integrative healthcare provider, serving up to two thirds of the UK population at over 200 locations – including hospitals, health and fitness clubs, health assessment centres and client workplaces. Their mission is to provide safe, affordable and accessible healthcare.

BANT believes this is a step forward in the recognition and integration of our profession, and one that will set the precedent with other private healthcare providers. We note that BANT membership and CNHC registration were mandatory requirements for applicants. We would like to think that the commitment to raise and support standards of excellence in the nutritional therapy profession will have had some influence in Nuffield’s decision to demand these professional credentials, and would encourage all nutritional therapists to become members of BANT and register with the CNHC so that more health providers will begin to recognise the profession is committed to voluntary self-regulation and maintaining standards of excellence in all aspects of professional practice.

BANT would like to congratulate all 20 BANT members for their achievement and wish them all the very best in their new jobs.

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

The Human Microbiome Project

Selected videos at the cutting edge of science. Genetic diversity reflects evolutionary pressures from environmental changes, principally climate and diet. These drivers explain why populations and individuals vary and why one-size-fits-all dietary guidelines and public health nutrition approaches derive from out-of-date reductionist science. Nutritional therapy is person-centred, recognising individuality and the complex network of environmental factors which influence health status.

Remember to subscribe to the BANT You Tube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/BANTNT

Please watch the videos in the order they appear starting at number 1.

The Human Microbiome Project

The year 2008 saw the launch of the Human Microbiome Project, sponsored by the National institute for Health in the United States, a project with the goal of identifying the microorganisms in the human gut. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Microbiome_Project

Seen as a natural extension of the Human Genome Project, the Human Microbiome project was launched as a result of the understanding that the health of our gut microflora profoundly influences the human immune system and is linked with inflammation, which is associated with most of the major chronic complex diseases today.

This understanding has lead the worlds leading science journals to start to recognise the profound importance of nutrition and how it may interact with the human microbiome and health.

An example is the paper in Nature in 2011, called “Human nutrition, the gut microbiome and immune system: envisioning the future” the authors state: systematic changes in overall dietary consumption patterns across a population might lead to changes in the microbiota/microbiome with consequences for host nutritional status and immune responses.”

Click on the highlighted title above to read the full paper.

1) GoldLab Symposium 2012 – Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Jeremy Nicholson a Professor of chemistry and systems biology and is head of the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London.

Even as a young biochemist in the 1980s, Prof. Jeremy Nicholson brimmed with new ideas. In a decade when molecular biology and the human genome project had riveted the attention of the scientific community, Prof. Nicholson was one of the first to embrace the importance of metabolic profiling, and is now Head of one of the largest clinical academic departments in the world.

For his work, Nicholson has received numerous honors, including The Royal Society of Chemistry Gold Medal for Analytical Chemistry, the Pfizer Global Chemistry Prize for Chemical Biology and the Semmelweis University – Budapest Prize in Biomedicine.  Professor Jeremy Nicholson was also a guest speaker at the 2010 BANT AGM.

2) Human Gut Microbes – Dr Jeff Gordon

Dr Gorden is the Professor and Director, Center for Genome Sciences & Systems Biology at the University of Washington.

Human Gut Microbes

Leave a comment

Epigenetic Videos

Selected videos at the cutting edge of science. Genetic diversity reflects evolutionary pressures from environmental changes, principally climate and diet. These drivers explain why populations and individuals vary and why one-size-fits-all dietary guidelines and public health nutrition approaches derive from out-of-date reductionist science. Nutritional therapy is person-centred, recognising individuality and the complex network of environmental factors which influence health status.

Remember to subscribe to the BANT You Tube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/BANTNT

Please watch the videos in the order they appear starting at number 1.

1) Epigenetics: How Genes and Environment Interact – Randy Jirtle, PhD

Professor Randy L. Jirtle heads the epigenetics and imprinting laboratory at Duke University in Durham, NC. Dr. Jirtle’s research interests are in epigenetics, genomic imprinting, and the fetal origins of disease susceptibility. He has published over 170 peer-reviewed articles, and was a featured scientist on the NOVA television program on epigenetics entitled Ghost in Your Genes. He was invited to speak at the 2004 Nobel Symposium on Epigenetics. He was honored in 2006 with the Distinguished Achievement Award from the College of Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 2007, Dr. Jirtle received an Esther B. O’Keeffe Charitable Foundation Award and was nominated for Time Magazine’s “Person of the Year.” He was the inaugural recipient of the Epigenetic Medicine Award in 2008, and received the STARS Lecture Award in Nutrition and Cancer from the National Cancer Institute in 2009.

,

Leave a comment

Thinking of Studying Nutritional Therapy?

If you want to understand more about what Nutritional therapy is all about, we recommend that you have a look at the articles published in the categories called “Functional Medicine” and “Personalised Nutrition” in this blogsite.  To get you started this link will give you good idea of how BANT members approach clinical practice: Functional Medicine Teaching Model Presentation

There is huge interest in the area of nutrition and health, including nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics. For those considering a vocational profession in this field, you may find it useful to look at our recommended core textbooks as well, which are an essential foundation for the future of nutrigenetic counselling:

Jones, S., Quinn S., eds.,(2005). Textbook of Functional Medicine. USA: Institute of Functional Medicine http://www.functionalmedicine.org/

Lord, R.S., Bralley J.A.,(2008). Laboratory Evaluations for Integrative and Functional Medicine. 2nd edn. Duluth, Georgia: Metametrix Institute.  [Table of Errata available from www.metametrixinstitute.org/post/2008/12/11/Table-of-Errata.aspx]

Leave a comment

Personalised Nutrition Videos

Selected videos at the cutting edge of science. Genetic diversity reflects evolutionary pressures from environmental changes, principally climate and diet. These drivers explain why populations and individuals vary and why one-size-fits-all dietary guidelines and public health nutrition approaches derive from out-of-date reductionist science. Nutritional therapy is person-centred, recognising individuality and the complex network of environmental factors which influence health status.

Remember to subscribe to the BANT You Tube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/BANTNT

Please watch the videos in the order they appear starting at number 1.

1) Individuality in Caffeine Metabolism – J Craig Venter

J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., is regarded as one of the leading scientists of the 21st century for his numerous invaluable contributions to genomic research. He is Founder, Chairman, and CEO of the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), a not-for-profit, research organization with approximately 300 scientists and staff dedicated to human, microbial, plant, synthetic and environmental genomic research, and the exploration of social and ethical issues in genomics.

Dr. Venter is also Founder and CEO of Synthetic Genomics Inc (SGI), a privately held company dedicated to commercializing genomic-driven solutions to address global needs such as new sources of energy, new food and nutritional products, and next generation vaccines.

Dr. Venter began his formal education after a tour of duty as a Navy Corpsman in Vietnam from 1967 to 1968. After earning both a Bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry and a Ph.D. in Physiology and Pharmacology from the University of California at San Diego, he was appointed professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo and the Roswell Park Cancer Institute. In 1984, he moved to the National Institutes of Health campus where he developed Expressed Sequence Tags or ESTs, a revolutionary new strategy for rapid gene discovery. In 1992 Dr. Venter founded The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR, now part of JCVI), a not-for-profit research institute, where in 1995 he and his team decoded the genome of the first free-living organism, the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae, using his new whole genome shotgun technique.

In 1998, Dr. Venter founded Celera Genomics to sequence the human genome using new tools and techniques he and his team developed. This research culminated with the February 2001 publication of the human genome in the journal, Science. He and his team at Celera also sequenced the fruit fly, mouse and rat genomes.

Dr. Venter and his team at JCVI continue to blaze new trails in genomics. They have sequenced and analyzed hundreds of genomes, and have published numerous important papers covering such areas as environmental genomics, the first complete diploid human genome, and the groundbreaking advance in creating the first self- replicating bacterial cell constructed entirely with synthetic DNA.

Dr. Venter is one of the most frequently cited scientists, and the author of more than 250 research articles. He is also the recipient of numerous honorary degrees, public honors, and scientific awards, including the 2008 United States National Medal of Science, the 2002 Gairdner Foundation International Award, the 2001 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize and the King Faisal International Award for Science. Dr. Venter is a member of numerous prestigious scientific organizations including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Society for Microbiology.

2) Sugar: The Bitter Truth – Robert H Lustig MD

Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology; Director, UCSF Weight Assessment for Teen and Child Health (WATCH) Program

 Dr. Lustig is a nationally-recognized authority in the field of neuroendocrinology, with a specific emphasis on the regulation of energy balance by the central nervous system. He is currently investigating the contribution of biochemical, neural, hormonal, and genetic influences in the expression of the current obesity epidemic both in children and adults. He has defined a syndrome of vagally-mediated beta-cell hyperactivity which leads to insulin hypersecretion and obesity, and which is treatable by insulin suppression. This phenomenon may occur in up to 20% of the obese population. He is interested in the hypothalamic signal transduction of insulin and leptin, and how these two systems interact. He is studying the cardiovascular morbidity associated with hyperinsulinemia, and developing methods to evaluate and prevent this phenomenon in children. He is also analyzing the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to insulin secretion and insulin resistance in obese children, and the utility of assessing insulin dynamics in targeting obesity therapy.

Dr. Lustig graduated from MIT, and received his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College. He performed his pediatric residency at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, and his clinical fellowship at UCSF. From there, he spent six years as a post-doctoral fellow in neuroendocrinology at The Rockefeller University in New York.

Dr. Lustig has authored over 70 research articles and 35 chapters.  He is the Chairman of the Obesity Task Force of the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society, a member of the Obesity Task force of The Endocrine Society, and on the Steering Committee of the International Endocrine Alliance to Combat Obesity.

, , , ,

Leave a comment

Evolutionary Biology Videos

Selected videos at the cutting edge of science. Genetic diversity reflects evolutionary pressures from environmental changes, principally climate and diet. These drivers explain why populations and individuals vary and why one-size-fits-all dietary guidelines and public health nutrition approaches derive from out-of-date reductionist science. Nutritional therapy is person-centred, recognising individuality and the complex network of environmental factors which influence health status.

Remember to subscribe to the BANT You Tube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/BANTNT

Evolutionary Biology

Evolutionary biology is currently at the leading of science with new research and innovative insights set to profoundly impact medicine today. For an idea about how insights from evolutionary biology can impact us as nutritional therapists in practice, see this free article online called Evolutionary Medicine, it’s scope, interest and potential http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/279/1746/4305.full.pdf+html.

Please watch the videos in the order they appear starting at number 1.

1) Inevitable Life – Dr Eric Smith

In this first video presented by BANT in a series covering Evolutionary and Quantum Biology on the BANT Blogsite, we introduce the subject from the beginning with a talk by Dr Eric Smith. Dr Eric Smith received the Bachelor of Science in Physics and Mathematics from the California Institute of Technology in 1987, and a Ph.D. in Physics from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993, with a dissertation on problems in string theory and high-temperature superconductivity. From 1993 to 2000 he worked in physical, nonlinear, and statistical acoustics at the Applied Research Labs: U. T. Austin, and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. From 2000 he has worked at the Santa Fe Institute on problems of self-organization in thermal, chemical, and biological systems. A focus of his current work is the statistical mechanics of the transition from the geochemistry of the early earth to the first levels of biological organization, with some emphasis on the emergence of the metabolic network.

Many researchers have supposed that the emergence of life hinged on a sequence of improbable events, at the same time as they have taken for granted the ability of life on earth to persist indefinitely and to “freeze in” the consequences of early accidents. Smith argues that there is ample evidence for a different interpretation: the emergence of life was an inevitable outcome of geochemistry on the early earth, and the same forces responsible for emergence have continued to support the persistence of life ever since. Smith sets out the case that metabolism preceded control in biological evolution, and that the citric acid cycle is the key bridge from geochemistry to biology.

 

2) Primate Evolution and Human Disease – Ajit Varki MD

Ajit Varki received basic training in physiology, medicine, biology, and biochemistry at the Christian Medical College, Vellore, The University of Nebraska, and Washington University in St. Louis.  He also has formal training and certification in internal medicine, hematology, and oncology.  He is currently distinguished professor of medicine and cellular and molecular medicine, and co-director of the Glycobiology Research and Training Center at UCSD.  Dr. Varki is executive editor of the textbook Essentials of Glycobiology.  He is also a co-director for the UCSD Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny and is an affiliate faculty member of the Living Links Center of Emory University.  Dr. Varki is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Association of American Physicians.

Dr. Varki is recipient of a MERIT award from the NIH, an American Cancer Society Faculty Research Award, the Karl Meyer Award of the Society for Glycobiology and the International Glycoconjugate Organization (IGO) Award (2007).  He is a member of the Faculty of 1000 and serves on the National Chimpanzee Observatory Working Group; the scientific advisory board of the Huntsman Cancer Institute (University of Utah), and the editorial board of Glycobiology.  He is a specialist advisor to the Human Gene Nomenclature Committee. Significant past appointments include: Associate Dean for Physician-Scientist Training at UCSD (2003-10); co-head, Division of Hematology/Oncology (1987-89): president of the Society for Glycobiology (1996); editor-in-chief of the Journal of Clinical Investigation (1992-97); consulting editor for the Journal of Clinical Investigation (1998-2006), and PLoS Medicine (2004-2008); interim directorship of the UCSD Cancer Center (1996-97); president of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (1998-99); scientific advisor to the Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (University of Georgia); the Yerkes Primate Center (Emory University); member of the National Advisory Committee of PubMed Central (NLM/NIH); and coordinator for the multidisciplinary UCSD Project for Explaining the Origins of Humans (1996-2007).

3) The Year of Darwin – Dr Sean B. Carroll

Sean B. Carroll is an award-winning scientist, author, and educator. He is currently Vice President for Science Education of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the largest private supporter of science education activities in the US, and Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the University of Wisconsin. His research has centered on the genes that control animal body patterns and play major roles in the evolution of animal diversity. Major discoveries from his laboratory have been featured in TIME, US News & World Report, The New York Times, Discover, and Natural History.

Sean is the author of Remarkable Creatures: Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species (2009, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), The Making of the Fittest (2006, W.W. Norton) and of Endless Forms Most Beautiful: The New Science of Evo Devo (2005, W.W. Norton). He also writes a monthly feature “Remarkable Creatures” for the New York Times Science Times.

Sean is also author of the student text Into The Jungle: Great Adventures in the Search for Evolution (2008, Pearson, Benjamin Cummings), co-author with Jen Grenier and Scott Weatherbee of the textbook From DNA to Diversity: Molecular Genetics and the Evolution of Animal Design (2nd ed, 2005; Blackwell Scientific) and with Anthony Griffiths, Susan Wessler, and John Doebley of the textbook Introduction to Genetic Analysis (10e, 2011, W.H. Freeman and Co.). He is also the author or co-author of more than 100 scientific papers.

Sean is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has received the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Life Science, National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, the Shaw Scientist Award of the Milwaukee Foundation, the Stephen Jay Gould Prize for promoting the public understanding of evolution, the Viktor Hamburger Outstanding Educator Prize, the Distinguished Service Award from the National Association of Biology Teachers, and numerous honorary lectureships. Sean was named one of America’s most promising leaders under 40 by TIME Magazine in 1994.

He earned his B.A. in Biology at Washington University in St. Louis, his Ph.D. in Immunology at Tufts Medical School, and carried out his postdoctoral research with Dr. Matthew Scott at the University of Colorado-Boulder. He received an honorary Doctor of Science from the University of Minnesota in 2009.

, , , ,

1 Comment

Why Nutrition Needs to be Personalised – Evolutionary Biology and Genetic Diversity

Selected videos at the cutting edge of science. Genetic diversity reflects evolutionary pressures from environmental changes, principally climate and diet. These drivers explain why populations and individuals vary and why one-size-fits-all dietary guidelines and public health nutrition approaches derive from out-of-date reductionist science. Nutritional therapy is person-centred, recognising individuality and the complex network of environmental factors which influence health status.

Remember to subscribe to the BANT You Tube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/BANTNT

Systems Approaches to Understanding Circadian Transcriptional Networks

J Craig Venter on Individuality in Caffeine Metabolism

Eric Schadt, 2011 Allen Institute of Brain Science Symposium

Scaling Laws in Biology and Other Complex Systems by Geoffrey H West PhD

Primate Evolution and Human Disease by Ajit Varki MD

Sugar: The Bitter Truth by Robert H Lustig MD

Mitochondrial Paradigm by Douglas Wallace

Inevitable Life by Eric Smith

, , , ,

Leave a comment

The Difference between Nutritional Therapists and NHS Dietitians Part 3

This is the third in a series of briefing notes setting out the key differences between dietitians and nutritional therapists (NTs).

Nutritional therapy practice is often attacked for not being ‘evidence-based’ in contrast to dietetic practice. In fact leading expert dietitians readily admit the lack of evidence underpinning their current practice: the 2007 edition of the BDA Manual of Dietetic Practice, page 134, states:

“Section 1.16.8 Evidence based practice ..In order to be able to access and assess clinical evidence, dietitians must be able to search the literature and have skills in critical appraisal…. They also need to be aware of a major constraint in using an evidence-based approach in dietetics, i.e. the shortage of coherent, consistent scientific evidence for much of dietetic practice.

What dietitians do regard as ‘evidence-based’ are the national dietary guidelines based on 1991 Department of Health recommendations. However in November 2009 the UK Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition published new proposed calorie guidelines after admitting that the 1991 calculations were flawed and inaccurate. This may have huge implications for other recommendations across dietetic practice and food labelling.

In 2009 rapid advances have been made in nutrigenomics/nutrigenetics but as early as 2002 Artemis Simopoulos of the Centre for Genetics, Nutrition and Health in Washington DC said “there may be no such thing as a ‘normal’ population with respect to nutrient requirements, as was assumed when dietary reference values were established“, and “…populations should not copy each other’s dietary recommendations for the prevention of coronary artery disease, and cancer, or any other disease for that matter“. In 2006 the US Institute of Medicine President Fineberg spoke about the challenge facing the public health paradigm: “It is not just possible but likely that there are nutrients that affect some population groups differently than others, and public health guidelines will have to take such differences into account…A public health paradigm of universal education is going to have to be adapted to the scientific reality and scientific knowledge as it develops and unfolds“. And in 2007 experts from the European Food Safety Authority advised that food-based dietary guidelines could not be set at the European level, at most at the national level but even then special groups would have to be considered.

So the answer to the question “Why do nutritional therapists exist if dietetic practice is evidence-based and works?” is that NTs have long-recognised the extent of biochemical individuality and the potential flaws in transferring population guidelines to recommendations for optimising individual health. Public appreciation of NT as effective and meeting individual health goals grows year on year. Put simply, professional advice for optimal health has to take account of unique dietary and nutritional needs – and that is what NTs are trained to give.

References

Ames, B.N. 2003. The metabolic tune-up: metabolic harmony and disease prevention. Journal of Nutrition 133: 1544S-1548

S. Ames, B.N., Elson-Schwab, I. and Silver, E.A. 2002. High-dose vitamin therapy stimulates variant enzymes with decreased coenzyme binding affinity (increased K(m)): relevance to genetic disease and polymorphisms. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 75: 616-658.

British Dietetic Association, 2007. Manual of Dietetic Practice

Dept. Health. Dietary reference Values for Food Energy and Nutrients for the United Kingdom (DH, 1991)

European Food Safety Authority. 2007. Food based dietary guidelines. Report of the 5th Scientific Colloquium. Available at: www.efsa.europa.eu/EFSA/ScientificOpinionPublicationReport /EFSAScientificColloquiumReports/efsa_locale-1178620753812_FBDG.htm

Fenech, M. 2005. The Genome Health Clinic and Genome Health Nutrigenomics concepts: diagnosis and nutritional treatment of genome and epigenome damage on an individual basis. Mutagenesis 20: 255-269.

SACN, 2009. Draft Energy Requirements Report http://www.sacn.gov.uk/reports_position_statements/reports/draft_energy_requirements_report_scientific_consultation_-_november_2009.html

Simopoulos, A.P. 2002. Genetic variation and dietary response: nutrigenetics/nutrigenomics. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition 11: 117-128.

Yaktine, A.L. and Pool, R. 2006. Nutrigenomics and beyond: informing the future. National Academies Press, Washington DC, USA.

Leave a comment