BANT Champions Nutritional Therapy to Tackle Obesity Epidemic

The British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) today put forward its members as key players in the fight against the nation’s obesity crisis.

The move comes after the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) released the UK’s obesity statistics today.

The HSCIC’s report shows the proportion of adults with a normal Body Mass Index (BMI) decreased between 1993 and 2012 from 41.0 per cent to 32.1 per cent among men and from 49.5 per cent to 40.6 per cent among women. There was a marked increase in the proportion of adults that were obese between 1993 and 2012 from 13.2 per cent to 24.4 per cent among men and from 16.4 per cent to 25.1 per cent among women.

BANT Deputy Chair Deborah Colson said: “Today’s statistics are extremely concerning. Action needs to be taken to do something about this epidemic as a matter of urgency.

“Everyone has their own barriers to losing weight, their own stresses, commitments and ways of dealing with their health, diet and exercise, so a one size fits all approach is unlikely to be successful. People struggling with their weight need personalised support.

“There are many factors involved in losing weight other than just eat less and move more. Other health conditions can inhibit weight loss, nutrient imbalances will play a part, environmental factors like shift working and stress can have a huge influence, and there are also psychological factors for those who find themselves struggling with their relationship with food. This is why it is so important that everyone is getting the individual help they need,” she added.

BANT has more than 2,000 nutritional therapists across the country who provide personalised support and weight management plans. Find your local nutritional therapist at www.bant.org.uk.

Key facts from the HSCIC report:

  • The proportion of adults with a normal Body Mass Index (BMI) decreased between 1993 and 2012 from 41.0 per cent to 32.1 per cent among men and from 49.5 per cent to 40.6 per cent among women.
  • There was a marked increase in the proportion of adults that were obese between 1993 and 2012 from 13.2 per cent to 24.4 per cent among men and from 16.4 per cent to 25.1 per cent among women.
  • In 2012, 67 per cent of men and 55 per cent of women aged 16 and over met the new recommendations for aerobic activity. 26 per cent of women and 19 per cent of men were classed as inactive.
  • While overall purchases of fruit and vegetables reduced between 2009 and 2012, consumers spent 8.3 per cent more on fresh and processed vegetables and 11.7 per cent more on fresh and processed fruit.
  • In 2012-13, there were 10,957 Finished Admission Episodes (FAEs) in NHS hospitals with a primary diagnosis of obesity among people of all ages. This is 6.6 per cent less admissions than in 2011-12 (11,736), although this is almost nine times higher than 2002-03 (1,275). This is based on inpatient data only. Inconsistencies in recording practice vary over time between hospitals as to whether some episodes are recorded as outpatient or inpatient.

Here is a link to the full report http://www.hscic.gov.uk/pubs/sopad14

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Unhealthy Brits Are Still Shunning Veggies

Veggie shy Brits are still not meeting the 5-a-day message more than 10 years since the campaign was launched, a survey of more than 2,000 people has revealed. Only 10% of those surveyed were tucking into five portions of vegetables or more on an average day and a shocking 6% were eating no vegetables at all, the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) has discovered.

BANT says that the results of the survey are extremely concerning as a healthy intake of vegetables should be closer to 7-a-day with just a couple of portions of fruit.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas said: “The message to eat more vegetables is a serious one. Research has shown a correlation between mortality rates and lower consumption of these types of foods.

“The consumption of vegetables is particularly important – they help our bodies to gain the nutrients we need to function. The idea that fruit and vegetables are interchangeable is no longer supported by current evidence, with vegetables being much more nutrient-dense than fruit, gram per gram. Long term deficiencies in these nutrients can lead to all sorts of health problems. Fruit contains valuable nutrients, but it can be high in sugar, so we have to be careful how much fruit we eat, alas eight pieces of fruit and one vegetable portion a day would not be an ideal fruit/vegetable spread.

“Some people just need a bit of inspiration to help change their diets for the better, others need help navigating their way around medications and serious health conditions, but some simple changes could have a very positive impact on so many lives. Changing the way you eat in the long term can prevent debilitating health conditions in the future and save lives, and there is help out there,” he added.

The YouGov survey suggests that the East of England is the ‘healthiest’ region in the country for getting their 5-a-day, though even here only 13% hitting those levels. Respondents in the North East and South West had the poorest intake of vegetables, with just 6% consuming their 5-a-day or more.

Alarmingly, on average 6% of respondents nationally said that they consumed no vegetables at all. The comparison across the regions was even more disturbing, with 11% of those in the North East consuming no vegetables compared to 3% in London.

The survey also showed that you were more likely to consume more vegetables the older you got – 7% of 18 to 24-year-olds consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day, rising to 11% of over 55s. And it showed that only 4% of students consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day compared with 10% of those who work.

BANT, which is the professional body for nutritional therapists and those working in nutritional science, commissioned the survey as part of its Diet for Life campaign – encouraging people to make changes to eat healthily for life and not just after Christmas.

Mr Toribio-Mateas added: “Healthy eating isn’t something we should be doing for a couple of weeks in January out of guilt to try to purge ourselves of the festive excess. We are encouraging people to try nutritional therapy to get themselves on the right track for 2014. Everyone is different and everyone has different health issues or needs. Nutritional therapy offers a personalised approach to health and nutrition – as well as some great advice on how to get those veggies into your diet every day, for life.”

To find your local Nutritional Therapist, go to www.bant.org.uk.

How to get more veggies in your diet:
• Snack on carrot, pepper or broccoli sticks and hummus instead of crisps or cereal bars
• Add a portion of broccoli, cabbage or carrots alongside dishes that don’t traditionally have veggies with them – pasta or curry
• Potatoes don’t count as veggies, so reduce the amount of potatoes on your plate and increase the number of colourful vegetables
• Have a salad with your sandwiches at lunch
• Use leftover vegetables to make a veggie soup

Watch out for more top tips and useful information on healthy eating in social media:
www.facebook.com/BANTonline
https://twitter.com/BANTonline

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fresh veg

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Unhealthy East Midlanders Are Still Shunning Veggies

Veggie shy East Midlanders are still not meeting the 5-a-day message more than 10 years since the campaign was launched, a survey has revealed. Only 8% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables on an average day and 6% were eating no vegetables at all, the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) has discovered.

Nationally only 10% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables a day and a shocking 6% were eating no vegetables at all.

BANT says that the results of the survey are extremely concerning as a healthy intake of vegetables should be closer to 7-a-day with just a couple of portions of fruit.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas said: “The message to eat more vegetables is a serious one. Research has shown a correlation between mortality rates and lower consumption of these types of foods.

“The consumption of vegetables is particularly important – they help our bodies to gain the nutrients we need to function. The idea that fruit and vegetables are interchangeable is no longer supported by current evidence, with vegetables being much more nutrient-dense than fruit, gram per gram. Long term deficiencies in these nutrients can lead to all sorts of health problems. Fruit contains valuable nutrients, but it can be high in sugar, so we have to be careful how much fruit we eat, alas eight pieces of fruit and one vegetable portion a day would not be an ideal fruit/vegetable spread.

“Some people just need a bit of inspiration to help change their diets for the better, others need help navigating their way around medications and serious health conditions, but some simple changes could have a very positive impact on so many lives. Changing the way you eat in the long term can prevent debilitating health conditions in the future and save lives, and there is help out there,” he added.

The YouGov survey suggests that the East of England is the ‘healthiest’ region in the country for getting their 5-a-day, though even here only 13% hitting the 5-a-day. Respondents in the North East and South West had the poorest intake of vegetables, with just 6% consuming their 5-a-day or more.

The survey also showed that you were more likely to consume more vegetables the older you got – 7% of 18 to 24-year-olds consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day, rising to 11% of over 55s. And it showed that only 4% of students consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day compared with 10% of those who work.

BANT, which is the professional body for nutritional therapists and those working in nutritional science, commissioned the survey as part of its Diet for Life campaign – encouraging people to make changes to eat healthily for life and not just after Christmas.

Mr Toribio-Mateas added: “Healthy eating isn’t something we should be doing for a couple of weeks in January out of guilt to try to purge ourselves of the festive excess. We are encouraging people to try nutritional therapy to get themselves on the right track for 2014. Everyone is different and everyone has different health issues or needs. Nutritional therapy offers a personalised approach to health and nutrition – as well as some great advice on how to get those veggies into your diet every day, for life.” 

To find your local Nutritional Therapist, go to www.bant.org.uk.

How to get more veggies in your diet:

  • Snack on carrot, pepper or broccoli sticks and hummus instead of crisps or cereal bars
  • Add a portion of broccoli, cabbage or carrots  alongside dishes that don’t traditionally have veggies with them – pasta or curry
  • Potatoes don’t count as veggies, so reduce the amount of potatoes on your plate and increase the number of colourful vegetables
  • Have a salad with your sandwiches at lunch
  • Use leftover vegetables to make a veggie soup

Watch out for more top tips and useful information on healthy eating in social media:

www.facebook.com/BANTonline

https://twitter.com/BANTonline

- ends -

All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc.  Total sample size was 2,222 adults. Fieldwork was undertaken between 11th – 13th December 2013. The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all GB adults (aged 18+).

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East of England Top Veggie Eating League Table

People in the East of England are the ‘healthiest’ in the country for getting their veggies… though still only 13% are eating five or more portions of vegetables a day and a shocking 5% are eating no veggies at all, a survey has revealed.

Nationally only 10% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables a day and a shocking 6% were eating no vegetables at all, the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) has discovered.

BANT says that the results of the survey are extremely concerning as a healthy intake of vegetables should be closer to 7-a-day with just a couple of portions of fruit.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas said: “The message to eat more vegetables is a serious one. Research has shown a correlation between mortality rates and lower consumption of these types of foods.

“The consumption of vegetables is particularly important – they help our bodies to gain the nutrients we need to function. The idea that fruit and vegetables are interchangeable is no longer supported by current evidence, with vegetables being much more nutrient-dense than fruit, gram per gram. Long term deficiencies in these nutrients can lead to all sorts of health problems. Fruit contains valuable nutrients, but it can be high in sugar, so we have to be careful how much fruit we eat, alas eight pieces of fruit and one vegetable portion a day would not be an ideal fruit/vegetable spread.

“Some people just need a bit of inspiration to help change their diets for the better, others need help navigating their way around medications and serious health conditions, but some simple changes could have a very positive impact on so many lives. Changing the way you eat in the long term can prevent debilitating health conditions in the future and save lives, and there is help out there,” he added.

The YouGov survey suggests respondents in the North East and South West had the poorest intake of vegetables, with just 6% consuming their 5-a-day or more.

The survey also showed that you were more likely to consume more vegetables the older you got – 7% of 18 to 24-year-olds consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day, rising to 11% of over 55s. And it showed that only 4% of students consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day compared with 10% of those who work.

BANT, which is the professional body for nutritional therapists and those working in nutritional science, commissioned the survey as part of its Diet for Life campaign – encouraging people to make changes to eat healthily for life and not just after Christmas.

Mr Toribio-Mateas added: “Healthy eating isn’t something we should be doing for a couple of weeks in January out of guilt to try to purge ourselves of the festive excess. We are encouraging people to try nutritional therapy to get themselves on the right track for 2014. Everyone is different and everyone has different health issues or needs. Nutritional therapy offers a personalised approach to health and nutrition – as well as some great advice on how to get those veggies into your diet every day, for life.”

To find your local Nutritional Therapist, go to www.bant.org.uk.

How to get more veggies in your diet:

  • Snack on carrot, pepper or broccoli sticks and hummus instead of crisps or cereal bars
  • Add a portion of broccoli, cabbage or carrots  alongside dishes that don’t traditionally have veggies with them – pasta or curry
  • Potatoes don’t count as veggies, so reduce the amount of potatoes on your plate and increase the number of colourful vegetables
  • Have a salad with your sandwiches at lunch
  • Use leftover vegetables to make a veggie soup

Watch out for more top tips and useful information on healthy eating in social media:

www.facebook.com/BANTonline

https://twitter.com/BANTonline

Leave a comment

Unhealthy Londoners Are Still Shunning Veggies

Veggie shy Londoners are still not meeting the 5-a-day message more than 10 years since the campaign was launched, a survey has revealed. Only 8% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables on an average day and 3% were eating no vegetables at all, the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) has discovered.

Nationally only 10% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables a day and a shocking 6% were eating no vegetables at all.

BANT says that the results of the survey are extremely concerning as a healthy intake of vegetables should be closer to 7-a-day with just a couple of portions of fruit.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas said: “The message to eat more vegetables is a serious one. Research has shown a correlation between mortality rates and lower consumption of these types of foods.

“The consumption of vegetables is particularly important – they help our bodies to gain the nutrients we need to function. The idea that fruit and vegetables are interchangeable is no longer supported by current evidence, with vegetables being much more nutrient-dense than fruit, gram per gram. Long term deficiencies in these nutrients can lead to all sorts of health problems. Fruit contains valuable nutrients, but it can be high in sugar, so we have to be careful how much fruit we eat, alas eight pieces of fruit and one vegetable portion a day would not be an ideal fruit/vegetable spread.

“Some people just need a bit of inspiration to help change their diets for the better, others need help navigating their way around medications and serious health conditions, but some simple changes could have a very positive impact on so many lives. Changing the way you eat in the long term can prevent debilitating health conditions in the future and save lives, and there is help out there,” he added.

The YouGov survey suggests that the East of England is the ‘healthiest’ region in the country for getting their 5-a-day, though even here only 13% hitting the 5-a-day. Respondents in the North East and South West had the poorest intake of vegetables, with just 6% consuming their 5-a-day or more.

The survey also showed that you were more likely to consume more vegetables the older you got – 7% of 18 to 24-year-olds consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day, rising to 11% of over 55s. And it showed that only 4% of students consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day compared with 10% of those who work.

BANT, which is the professional body for nutritional therapists and those working in nutritional science, commissioned the survey as part of its Diet for Life campaign – encouraging people to make changes to eat healthily for life and not just after Christmas.

Mr Toribio-Mateas added: “Healthy eating isn’t something we should be doing for a couple of weeks in January out of guilt to try to purge ourselves of the festive excess. We are encouraging people to try nutritional therapy to get themselves on the right track for 2014. Everyone is different and everyone has different health issues or needs. Nutritional therapy offers a personalised approach to health and nutrition – as well as some great advice on how to get those veggies into your diet every day, for life.” 

To find your local Nutritional Therapist, go to www.bant.org.uk.

How to get more veggies in your diet:

  • Snack on carrot, pepper or broccoli sticks and hummus instead of crisps or cereal bars
  • Add a portion of broccoli, cabbage or carrots  alongside dishes that don’t traditionally have veggies with them – pasta or curry
  • Potatoes don’t count as veggies, so reduce the amount of potatoes on your plate and increase the number of colourful vegetables
  • Have a salad with your sandwiches at lunch
  • Use leftover vegetables to make a veggie soup

Watch out for more top tips and useful information on healthy eating in social media:

www.facebook.com/BANTonline

https://twitter.com/BANTonline

Leave a comment

Unhealthy Northerners Are Still Shunning Veggies

A shocking 11% of North Easterners eat no vegetables in their daily diet and only 6% are eating fove or more portions of veggies a day, a survey has revealed.

The figures are in stark contrast to statistics in the south, where only 3% of those in London are failing to eat any vegetables. Nationally only 10% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables a day and a shocking 6% were eating no vegetables at all, the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) has discovered.

The disturbing findings come more than 10 years since the 5-a-day campaign was launched by the Government. BANT says the results of the survey are extremely concerning as a healthy intake of vegetables should be closer to 7-a-day with just a couple of portions of fruit.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas said: “The message to eat more vegetables is a serious one. Research has shown a correlation between mortality rates and lower consumption of these types of foods.

“The consumption of vegetables is particularly important – they help our bodies to gain the nutrients we need to function. The idea that fruit and vegetables are interchangeable is no longer supported by current evidence, with vegetables being much more nutrient-dense than fruit, gram per gram. Long term deficiencies in these nutrients can lead to all sorts of health problems. Fruit contains valuable nutrients, but it can be high in sugar, so we have to be careful how much fruit we eat, alas eight pieces of fruit and one vegetable portion a day would not be an ideal fruit/vegetable spread.

“Some people just need a bit of inspiration to help change their diets for the better, others need help navigating their way around medications and serious health conditions, but some simple changes could have a very positive impact on so many lives. Changing the way you eat in the long term can prevent debilitating health conditions in the future and save lives, and there is help out there,” he added.

The YouGov survey suggests that the East of England is the ‘healthiest’ region in the country for getting their 5-a-day, though even here only 13% hitting the Government guidelines. Respondents in the North East and South West had the poorest intake of vegetables, with just 6% consuming their 5-a-day or more.

Alarmingly, on average 6.0% of respondents nationally said that they consumed no vegetables at all.

The survey also showed that you were more likely to consume more vegetables the older you got – 7% of 18 to 24-year-olds consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day, rising to 11% of over 55s. And it showed that only 4% of students consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day compared with 10% of those who work.

BANT, which is the professional body for nutritional therapists and those working in nutritional science, commissioned the survey as part of its Diet for Life campaign – encouraging people to make changes to eat healthily for life and not just after Christmas.

Mr Toribio-Mateas added: “Healthy eating isn’t something we should be doing for a couple of weeks in January out of guilt to try to purge ourselves of the festive excess. We are encouraging people to try nutritional therapy to get themselves on the right track for 2014. Everyone is different and everyone has different health issues or needs. Nutritional therapy offers a personalised approach to health and nutrition – as well as some great advice on how to get those veggies into your diet every day, for life.” 

To find your local Nutritional Therapist, go to www.bant.org.uk.

How to get more veggies in your diet:

  • Snack on carrot, pepper or broccoli sticks and hummus instead of crisps or cereal bars
  • Add a portion of broccoli, cabbage or carrots  alongside dishes that don’t traditionally have veggies with them – pasta or curry
  • Potatoes don’t count as veggies, so reduce the amount of potatoes on your plate and increase the number of colourful vegetables
  • Have a salad with your sandwiches at lunch
  • Use leftover vegetables to make a veggie soup

Watch out for more top tips and useful information on healthy eating in social media:

www.facebook.com/BANTonline

https://twitter.com/BANTonline

Leave a comment

Unhealthy North Westerners Are Still Shunning Veggies

Veggie shy North Westerners are still not meeting the 5-a-day message more than 10 years since the campaign was launched, a survey has revealed. Only 11% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables on an average day and 5% were eating no vegetables at all, the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) has discovered.

Nationally only 10% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables a day and a shocking 6% were eating no vegetables at all.

BANT says that the results of the survey are extremely concerning as a healthy intake of vegetables should be closer to 7-a-day with just a couple of portions of fruit.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas said: “The message to eat more vegetables is a serious one. Research has shown a correlation between mortality rates and lower consumption of these types of foods.

“The consumption of vegetables is particularly important – they help our bodies to gain the nutrients we need to function. The idea that fruit and vegetables are interchangeable is no longer supported by current evidence, with vegetables being much more nutrient-dense than fruit, gram per gram. Long term deficiencies in these nutrients can lead to all sorts of health problems. Fruit contains valuable nutrients, but it can be high in sugar, so we have to be careful how much fruit we eat, alas eight pieces of fruit and one vegetable portion a day would not be an ideal fruit/vegetable spread.

“Some people just need a bit of inspiration to help change their diets for the better, others need help navigating their way around medications and serious health conditions, but some simple changes could have a very positive impact on so many lives. Changing the way you eat in the long term can prevent debilitating health conditions in the future and save lives, and there is help out there,” he added.

The YouGov survey suggests that the East of England is the ‘healthiest’ region in the country for getting their 5-a-day, though even here only 13% hitting the 5-a-day. Respondents in the North East and South West had the poorest intake of vegetables, with just 6% consuming their 5-a-day or more.

The survey also showed that you were more likely to consume more vegetables the older you got – 7% of 18 to 24-year-olds consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day, rising to 11% of over 55s. And it showed that only 4% of students consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day compared with 10% of those who work.

BANT, which is the professional body for nutritional therapists and those working in nutritional science, commissioned the survey as part of its Diet for Life campaign – encouraging people to make changes to eat healthily for life and not just after Christmas.

Mr Toribio-Mateas added: “Healthy eating isn’t something we should be doing for a couple of weeks in January out of guilt to try to purge ourselves of the festive excess. We are encouraging people to try nutritional therapy to get themselves on the right track for 2014. Everyone is different and everyone has different health issues or needs. Nutritional therapy offers a personalised approach to health and nutrition – as well as some great advice on how to get those veggies into your diet every day, for life.” 

To find your local Nutritional Therapist, go to www.bant.org.uk.

How to get more veggies in your diet:

  • Snack on carrot, pepper or broccoli sticks and hummus instead of crisps or cereal bars
  • Add a portion of broccoli, cabbage or carrots  alongside dishes that don’t traditionally have veggies with them – pasta or curry
  • Potatoes don’t count as veggies, so reduce the amount of potatoes on your plate and increase the number of colourful vegetables
  • Have a salad with your sandwiches at lunch
  • Use leftover vegetables to make a veggie soup

Watch out for more top tips and useful information on healthy eating in social media:

www.facebook.com/BANTonline

https://twitter.com/BANTonline

Leave a comment

Unhealthy Southerners Are Still Shunning Veggies

Veggie shy South Easterners are still not meeting the 5-a-day message more than 10 years since the campaign was launched, a survey has revealed. Only 11% of those surveyed were tucking into five portions of vegetables or more on an average day and a shocking 8% were eating no vegetables at all, the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) has discovered.

Nationally only 10% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables a day and a shocking 6% were eating no vegetables at all.

BANT says that the results of the survey are extremely concerning as a healthy intake of vegetables should be closer to 7-a-day with just a couple of portions of fruit.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas said: “The message to eat more vegetables is a serious one. Research has shown a correlation between mortality rates and lower consumption of these types of foods.

“The consumption of vegetables is particularly important – they help our bodies to gain the nutrients we need to function. The idea that fruit and vegetables are interchangeable is no longer supported by current evidence, with vegetables being much more nutrient-dense than fruit, gram per gram. Long term deficiencies in these nutrients can lead to all sorts of health problems. Fruit contains valuable nutrients, but it can be high in sugar, so we have to be careful how much fruit we eat, alas eight pieces of fruit and one vegetable portion a day would not be an ideal fruit/vegetable spread.

“Some people just need a bit of inspiration to help change their diets for the better, others need help navigating their way around medications and serious health conditions, but some simple changes could have a very positive impact on so many lives. Changing the way you eat in the long term can prevent debilitating health conditions in the future and save lives, and there is help out there,” he added.

The YouGov survey suggests that the East of England is the ‘healthiest’ region in the country for getting their 5-a-day, though even here only 13% hitting the Government guidelines. Respondents in the North East and South West had the poorest intake of vegetables, with just 6% consuming their 5-a-day or more.

The survey also showed that you were more likely to consume more vegetables the older you got – 7% of 18 to 24-year-olds consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day, rising to 11% of over 55s. And it showed that only 4% of students consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day compared with 10% of those who work.

BANT, which is the professional body for nutritional therapists and those working in nutritional science, commissioned the survey as part of its Diet for Life campaign – encouraging people to make changes to eat healthily for life and not just after Christmas.

Mr Toribio-Mateas added: “Healthy eating isn’t something we should be doing for a couple of weeks in January out of guilt to try to purge ourselves of the festive excess. We are encouraging people to try nutritional therapy to get themselves on the right track for 2014. Everyone is different and everyone has different health issues or needs. Nutritional therapy offers a personalised approach to health and nutrition – as well as some great advice on how to get those veggies into your diet every day, for life.” 

To find your local Nutritional Therapist, go to www.bant.org.uk.

How to get more veggies in your diet:

  • Snack on carrot, pepper or broccoli sticks and hummus instead of crisps or cereal bars
  • Add a portion of broccoli, cabbage or carrots  alongside dishes that don’t traditionally have veggies with them – pasta or curry
  • Potatoes don’t count as veggies, so reduce the amount of potatoes on your plate and increase the number of colourful vegetables
  • Have a salad with your sandwiches at lunch
  • Use leftover vegetables to make a veggie soup

Watch out for more top tips and useful information on healthy eating in social media:

www.facebook.com/BANTonline

https://twitter.com/BANTonline

Leave a comment

Unhealthy Scots Are Still Shunning Veggies

A shocking 9% of Scots eat no vegetables in their daily diet and only 8% are eating five or more portions of veggies a day, a survey has revealed.

The figures are in stark contrast to statistics in the south, where only 3% of those in London are failing to eat any vegetables. Nationally only 10% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables a day and a shocking 6% were eating no vegetables at all, the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) has discovered.

The disturbing findings come more than 10 years since the 5-a-day campaign was launched by the Government. BANT says the results of the survey are extremely concerning as a healthy intake of vegetables should be closer to 7-a-day with just a couple of portions of fruit.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas said: “The message to eat more vegetables is a serious one. Research has shown a correlation between mortality rates and lower consumption of these types of foods.

“The consumption of vegetables is particularly important – they help our bodies to gain the nutrients we need to function. The idea that fruit and vegetables are interchangeable is no longer supported by current evidence, with vegetables being much more nutrient-dense than fruit, gram per gram. Long term deficiencies in these nutrients can lead to all sorts of health problems. Fruit contains valuable nutrients, but it can be high in sugar, so we have to be careful how much fruit we eat, alas eight pieces of fruit and one vegetable portion a day would not be an ideal fruit/vegetable spread.

“Some people just need a bit of inspiration to help change their diets for the better, others need help navigating their way around medications and serious health conditions, but some simple changes could have a very positive impact on so many lives. Changing the way you eat in the long term can prevent debilitating health conditions in the future and save lives, and there is help out there,” he added.

The YouGov survey suggests that the East of England is the ‘healthiest’ region in the country for getting their 5-a-day, though even here only 13% hitting the Government guidelines. Respondents in the North East and South West had the poorest intake of vegetables, with just 6% consuming their 5-a-day or more.

The survey also showed that you were more likely to consume more vegetables the older you got – 7% of 18 to 24-year-olds consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day, rising to 11% of over 55s. And it showed that only 4% of students consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day compared with 10% of those who work.

BANT, which is the professional body for nutritional therapists and those working in nutritional science, commissioned the survey as part of its Diet for Life campaign – encouraging people to make changes to eat healthily for life and not just after Christmas.

Mr Toribio-Mateas added: “Healthy eating isn’t something we should be doing for a couple of weeks in January out of guilt to try to purge ourselves of the festive excess. We are encouraging people to try nutritional therapy to get themselves on the right track for 2014. Everyone is different and everyone has different health issues or needs. Nutritional therapy offers a personalised approach to health and nutrition – as well as some great advice on how to get those veggies into your diet every day, for life.” 

To find your local Nutritional Therapist, go to www.bant.org.uk.

How to get more veggies in your diet:

  • Snack on carrot, pepper or broccoli sticks and hummus instead of crisps or cereal bars
  • Add a portion of broccoli, cabbage or carrots  alongside dishes that don’t traditionally have veggies with them – pasta or curry
  • Potatoes don’t count as veggies, so reduce the amount of potatoes on your plate and increase the number of colourful vegetables
  • Have a salad with your sandwiches at lunch
  • Use leftover vegetables to make a veggie soup

Watch out for more top tips and useful information on healthy eating in social media:

www.facebook.com/BANTonline

https://twitter.com/BANTonline

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Unhealthy South Westerners Are Still Shunning Veggies

Veggie shy South Westerners are still not meeting the 5-a-day message more than 10 years since the campaign was launched, a survey has revealed. The region came out bottom in the veggie eating league table alongside the North East. Only 6% of those surveyed were tucking in to five or more portions of vegetables a day and 4% were eating none at all, the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) has discovered.

Nationally only 10% of those surveyed were tucking into five or more portions of vegetables a day and a shocking 6% were eating none at all.

BANT says that the results of the survey are extremely concerning as a healthy intake of vegetables should be closer to 7-a-day with just a couple of portions of fruit.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas said: “The message to eat more vegetables is a serious one. Research has shown a correlation between mortality rates and lower consumption of these types of foods.

“The consumption of vegetables is particularly important – they help our bodies to gain the nutrients we need to function. The idea that fruit and vegetables are interchangeable is no longer supported by current evidence, with vegetables being much more nutrient-dense than fruit, gram per gram. Long term deficiencies in these nutrients can lead to all sorts of health problems. Fruit contains valuable nutrients, but it can be high in sugar, so we have to be careful how much fruit we eat, alas eight pieces of fruit and one vegetable portion a day would not be an ideal fruit/vegetable spread.

“Some people just need a bit of inspiration to help change their diets for the better, others need help navigating their way around medications and serious health conditions, but some simple changes could have a very positive impact on so many lives. Changing the way you eat in the long term can prevent debilitating health conditions in the future and save lives, and there is help out there,” he added.

The YouGov survey suggests that the East of England is the ‘healthiest’ region in the country for getting their 5-a-day, though even here only 13% hitting the 5-a-day.

The survey also showed that you were more likely to consume more vegetables the older you got – 7% of 18 to 24-year-olds consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day, rising to 11% of over 55s. And it showed that only 4% of students consumed five or more portions of vegetables a day compared with 10% of those who work.

BANT, which is the professional body for nutritional therapists and those working in nutritional science, commissioned the survey as part of its Diet for Life campaign – encouraging people to make changes to eat healthily for life and not just after Christmas.

Mr Toribio-Mateas added: “Healthy eating isn’t something we should be doing for a couple of weeks in January out of guilt to try to purge ourselves of the festive excess. We are encouraging people to try nutritional therapy to get themselves on the right track for 2014. Everyone is different and everyone has different health issues or needs. Nutritional therapy offers a personalised approach to health and nutrition – as well as some great advice on how to get those veggies into your diet every day, for life.” 

To find your local Nutritional Therapist, go to www.bant.org.uk.

How to get more veggies in your diet:

  • Snack on carrot, pepper or broccoli sticks and hummus instead of crisps or cereal bars
  • Add a portion of broccoli, cabbage or carrots  alongside dishes that don’t traditionally have veggies with them – pasta or curry
  • Potatoes don’t count as veggies, so reduce the amount of potatoes on your plate and increase the number of colourful vegetables
  • Have a salad with your sandwiches at lunch
  • Use leftover vegetables to make a veggie soup

Watch out for more top tips and useful information on healthy eating in social media:

www.facebook.com/BANTonline

https://twitter.com/BANTonline

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